Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Missing Weeds

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    5

    Missing Weeds

    Hi guys I need a valued opinion before I call the Ministry of Natural Resourses. This lake in Ontario I`ve been going to for 20 years had a major change this year. The best spot on the lake was missing almost all weed cover (coontail or cabomba) bottom just bare mud water temp. 74F. 2017 &16 it was normal weed cover. This year I saw more cormorants (you probably know what they do so does the MNR they will tell me cormorants are natural to the area ( translated MNR does`nt have to do anything until problem is out of control). What`s something that occurs naturally that would account for the weeds? PS as you have guessed I don`t have too much faith in the MNR having any answers. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Athens, Ohio, US.
    Posts
    389
    This has been an odd year for weather, it is possible that early high, muddy water prevented a good start. Also possible that local land owners did weed treatment of their docking areas and some got away. m

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fond du Lac, WI, USA.
    Posts
    260
    Spring weather impacted weed growth on the lake where I live in northern WI, but some lakes have had there cabbage beds wiped out by rusty cray fish. Don't know if rustys have made it to Ontario.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    Cormorants do not eat weeds. I noticed alot less weed growth in northern wi this year. High water, which leads to darker water can cause that issue.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd M View Post
    Cormorants do not eat weeds. I noticed alot less weed growth in northern wi this year. High water, which leads to darker water can cause that issue.
    Hello Todd M cormorants eat a lot of young fish it`s their body waste thats very acidic kills vegetation. Some years back an island in western Lake Erie had a large cormorant population they killed every tree on the island. The MNR answer oil the eggs I think it`s about job security. Eastern Lake Erie New York state same thing decimated the smallmouths then a group of hunters shot all the birds sounds better than oiling eggs.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by dark roast View Post
    Hello Todd M cormorants eat a lot of young fish it`s their body waste thats very acidic kills vegetation. Some years back an island in western Lake Erie had a large cormorant population they killed every tree on the island. The MNR answer oil the eggs I think it`s about job security. Eastern Lake Erie New York state same thing decimated the smallmouths then a group of hunters shot all the birds sounds better than oiling eggs.
    I am not finding any information on cormorants and absence of aquatic vegetation, just trees and foliage around above ground nesting areas. Cranes do the same thing. Cormorants need to be culled, there is a good reason for oiling eggs but hunting them needs to be done as well.
    Last edited by Todd M; 10-14-2018 at 07:14 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    tomahawk, wisconsin, u.s.a.
    Posts
    319
    Up on Vermillion same problem there... All the trees are dead on a lot of the islands

  8. #8
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,951
    Everything that's been stated above is true. Lakes and everything in them are dynamic, and though they may be the same for a while they do change with time. Length of winter and ice depth, timing of the ice melt, sunlight and warmth in winter, water depth, clarity, herbicides, rusty crayfish, invasive weed growth, etc. all affect weeds. You can't control any of them except the herbicides and the invasives, and the way to do that is to try to stop lakefront owners from "treating" their lakes, and to keep rusties and invasive weeds from populating the lake in the first place.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Austin, Tx
    Posts
    27
    'Skinny black loons' is what i'm going to start calling them. LOL. I agree that the Cormorants wont' affect the weed growth.. too much water to dilute their excrement. Yes, they will de vegetate tress they roost in though.

    How much agriculture is in the watershed you are in?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fond du Lac, WI, USA.
    Posts
    260
    Steve, as a volunteer who works the landing on the chain where I live, I can tell the absolute worst people to try and talk to about clean boats/clean water are musky fishermen. They also are the best.

    A couple of other volunteers, both retired businessmen who are articulate and polite have told me about being sworn at when they approached musky guides who were putting their boats in. In both cases, the volunteers started their canned speech of "hi I'm blank with the clean boats/clean water program" and got no further before the guys said "I ain't got time for that *****". And this from guys with the name of their guide service on their trucks.
    The one guide did this right before I took over. The volunteer told me about it when I relieved him and I then watched this "pro" do the worst job of launching a boat I have ever seen. At one point he had his Ranger parallel to shore before pulling it out and stating all over again. Lots more folks than lake property owners need educating.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •