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Thread: A-rig for musky?

  1. #1
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    A-rig for musky?

    I just picked an umbrella rig for musky and was wondering has anybody caught any fish on them? If so please tell me how.

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    I was fishing with Guide Mike Hulbert he used some of his gerbils on them and we caught some catfish and carp. Key was letting the gerbils do all the work

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    Quote Originally Posted by shocker View Post
    I was fishing with Guide Mike Hulbert he used some of his gerbils on them and we caught some catfish and carp. Key was letting the gerbils do all the work
    Gerbils, like the rodents? Or am I missing something?

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    I'm guessing it was a joke...

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    Quote Originally Posted by junkman View Post
    I'm guessing it was a joke...
    me too! Ha Ha

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    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    I imagine the action of the gerbil behind the umbrella rig would be pretty dramatic for the first couple casts, but repeated use would be brutal on the livebait. Maybe not as brutal as a day in the boat with Hulbert , but close.

    Seriously, umbrella rigs haven't really taken off among musky fishermen. I'm not sure why, because some bass fishermen love them and the illusion would seem to be the same -- that of school of baitfish being chased by a smallish predator, which would then be perceived as a meal by a larger predator (bass/musky).

    I've seen them cast with bucktails, minnowbaits and jerkbaits, and they create a lot of flash in the water. You've bought one, so give it a go this season. You just may be onto something nobody else is doing on your lake.
    Steve Heiting

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Heiting View Post

    Seriously, umbrella rigs haven't really taken off among musky fishermen. I'm not sure why...
    Really Steve? I know why. Because casting pounders pulling Double Cs all day is bad enough. You can only imagine what launching an A-rig loaded with lures would be like.

    I have played with one jigging vertically ala Uncut Angling (google that, you'll see) and even then it's a handful. More efficient and less tiring (for an old guy like me) to use other tools. That said, no reason to think it's not a very different look for fish that have seen it all.

    Use depends upon where you are. Here in WI no more than three lures with hooks on a rig as the DNR views each lure as a possibility to catch an individual fish. It happens with bass and I could see smaller pike competing like that. Even though the intention is to target muskies and the chances of catching two of them at the same time are slim to none that is the policy. Check with your local DNR for ruling in your location to stay on the fun side of stuff.

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    I have made a few A-Rigs (a three armed, four armed, and five armed model) and used Fat AZ 6" Swimmers on it. The five armed model was almost physically impossible to cast and retrieve. The four armed model could be cast, but it wasn't a pleasant experience and bringing it in was tough. The three armed model was still challenging to cast (harder to cast than a Pounder, but not as hard as a 2 Pounder). The resistance on the three armed model was rather signification as well.

    During it's first day of use, I was with a guide and I did catch a musky. It was only about a 38" fish and the funny thing is, since there is so much drag with the whole rig just on a straight retrieve, I didn't even know I had a fish right away. Once I felt a faint headshake did I realize it was on. Then when the fish was placed in the net, it did an alligator roll and every bait on that A-Rig snared into net creating a caccoon for the fish. After cutting hooks just to get the fish out safely, it took another 20 minutes to untangle the mess that was left post-release. That guide put a rule into effect at that moment, which he named after me. The rule was, if you were to hook a fish on the A-Rig, it was not going in his net.

    Needless to say, I haven't used that A-Rig since.
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    Last edited by Lucky Craft Man; 03-13-2017 at 09:18 PM.

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    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by otto View Post
    Really Steve? I know why. Because casting pounders pulling Double Cs all day is bad enough. You can only imagine what launching an A-rig loaded with lures would be like.

    I have played with one jigging vertically ala Uncut Angling (google that, you'll see) and even then it's a handful. More efficient and less tiring (for an old guy like me) to use other tools. That said, no reason to think it's not a very different look for fish that have seen it all.

    Use depends upon where you are. Here in WI no more than three lures with hooks on a rig as the DNR views each lure as a possibility to catch an individual fish. It happens with bass and I could see smaller pike competing like that. Even though the intention is to target muskies and the chances of catching two of them at the same time are slim to none that is the policy. Check with your local DNR for ruling in your location to stay on the fun side of stuff.
    Umbrella rigs are essentially a spider web ahead of the lure. Off the spider web are a bunch of small spoons, which are supposed to resemble a school of baitfish. These spoons do not have hooks, so you're in the clear with regard to the WI regs, or any other state's regs that limit the number of lures you can fish at one time.
    Steve Heiting

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Heiting View Post
    Umbrella rigs are essentially a spider web ahead of the lure. Off the spider web are a bunch of small spoons, which are supposed to resemble a school of baitfish. These spoons do not have hooks, so you're in the clear with regard to the WI regs, or any other state's regs that limit the number of lures you can fish at one time.
    All due respect Steve but any quick google for images of an Alabama or a-rig shows lures attached to the umbrella/spreader whatever you want to call it. The Uncut Angling guys had 3 Shadzilla Jr. swimbaits on theirs. And the bass guys are running swimbaits up to the number of hooks, lures, (again whatever) allowed by local regs.

    I know this started out in saltwater with just blades but didn't take long to morph into a multi-lure presentation just like the pics posted by Lucky Craft man. But you're right, if you only hang blades and use it as an attractor you could put put a hundred on if you wanted to.
    Last edited by otto; 03-18-2017 at 05:19 AM.

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