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Thread: Getting into muskie fishing a bit....

  1. #1
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    Getting into muskie fishing a bit....

    Have casted quite a bit for muskies in the past, but am wanting to fine tune and learn a few things that might help boat a few more fish since I'm mainly a walleye/crappie/wiper/flathead guy.

    I love throwing jerk baits, think it's a great time. They catch some nice pike, but of course I want muskies. Problem is, jerk baits and the like are pretty much all I do. I've got some big 1 ounce bass jigs that I plan on using, but a few questions would be when would you throw such an animal for muskies and pike? Anytime you see a bunch of sticks/brush/weeds you want to get thru?
    What kind of trailer would I put on such a jig? A twister tail? Shad/paddletail? 7"? 10"?

    I've got quite a few questions about that in particular.

    Also, when would you throw an inline spinner, or grandma, or jake, or stuff like that instead of a jerk bait?

    You can tell I like to throw jerks and will have a hard time straying away from them, but I want to broaden my skills a little as we will be throwing big baits in about 2 months or so.

    Thanks for any info and suggestions.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Jigs are probably an underused musky bait. I like reaper and creature tails for the most part, and use the bait for sight-fishing in clear water during the early season, on weed edges in cold fronts during the summer, and again on weed edges when I'm creeping the boat along and trailing livebait in the fall.

    As to the rest of your lure questions, bucktails allow you to cover water. If you contact more fish you catch more. I like using them from season's beginning up until turnover in fall, in warm, stable or pre-frontal conditions. Minnowbaits (G-Mas and Jakes) can also work in such situations but force you to fish a little more slowly. I find they're best when conditions are post-frontal throughout the season when you need to trigger fish with flash and a stop/go action. Jerkbaits fit the same criteria but typically need to be fished slower than a minnowbait and are best when the fish dictate you slow down and really pick a spot apart.

    A long time ago I wrote an article in Musky Hunter called "From Fast to Finesse," which describes a lure progression I use based on the musky's mood. The article was also adapted and expanded for the book, The Complete Guide to Musky Hunting. http://www.muskyhuntercatalog.com/in...&product_id=97
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  3. #3
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    Thanks Steve, that's exactly along the lines of what I was looking for. Lots of good info in there.

    As for jigs, I've been looking at some large bass worms, like ribbon tails and twister tails. Would those be worth giving a chance?

    I'm not familiar with the reapers, so I'll have to look those up.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B Robinson View Post
    As for jigs, I've been looking at some large bass worms, like ribbon tails and twister tails. Would those be worth giving a chance?

    I'm not familiar with the reapers, so I'll have to look those up.
    Reapers give the bait larger side profile, which worms do not. I'm not sure if that matters to muskies, but I think it does.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by B Robinson View Post
    Have casted quite a bit for muskies in the past, but am wanting to fine tune and learn a few things that might help boat a few more fish since I'm mainly a walleye/crappie/wiper/flathead guy.

    I love throwing jerk baits, think it's a great time. They catch some nice pike, but of course I want muskies. Problem is, jerk baits and the like are pretty much all I do. I've got some big 1 ounce bass jigs that I plan on using, but a few questions would be when would you throw such an animal for muskies and pike? Anytime you see a bunch of sticks/brush/weeds you want to get thru?
    What kind of trailer would I put on such a jig? A twister tail? Shad/paddletail? 7"? 10"?

    I've got quite a few questions about that in particular.

    Also, when would you throw an inline spinner, or grandma, or jake, or stuff like that instead of a jerk bait?

    You can tell I like to throw jerks and will have a hard time straying away from them, but I want to broaden my skills a little as we will be throwing big baits in about 2 months or so.

    Thanks for any info and suggestions.
    I've found that when fishing is slow using traditional tactics, such as bucktails, topwater, etc, then a jig with plastic or a minnow may be an excellent presentation choice. I've caught muskies on both 5 and 8 inch reapers, and 6 inch shad baits, but have seen them caught with wacky rigged plastic worms too. Tubes on a jig head can also be productive. An advantage of using jigs is you'll likely catch whatever is in the lake... bass, pike, walleye and muskies. That said, I too love throwing Suicks.

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