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Thread: In search of the perfect in-line spinnerbait

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    113

    In search of the perfect in-line spinnerbait

    Greetings,

    I am a hobby-type maker of spinnerbaits - both in-line and bent-arm styles. I make these baits during the winter, for use in the upcoming season. I find it to be fun to make the baits, and rewarding to catch a nice fish on one of my homemade lures. I'm always looking for new ideas/approaches when making such baits.

    What would your ideal in-line spinnerbait look like? Color schemes? Materials? Hook type, size and placement? Wire? Lure bodies? Length or weight?

    Many thanks. Good fishing and tight lines!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Athens, Ohio, US.
    Posts
    385
    One problem I've had with in-lines is the top clevis jambing against the end of the wire loop at the top. Usually happens after the bait has been used / bit a few times. I like to see a bead above the top clevis to help prevent this.
    My other frustration is sometimes the whole lure body will turn on the retrieve, m

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Dec 1969
    Location
    Illinois
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    625
    It’s funny that you mention the bead up top. I have made my own bucktails for many years and I have declared that bead as useless. I do leave a 1 inch gap from the top loop to the clevises. I notice some lure makers use this bead.

    I like two bladed lures where each blade is different by color or just hammered vs. smooth. I also add a to ounce lead weight in between the two tail sections to add weight along with the 3/8 to lead weight at the bottom. This really helps on windy days or when you need long casts to cover a spot. The downfall is going over vegetation. But, I find that most of the time I can do it but obviously at a faster speed. I make some with large bobbers in place of lead weights to run over thick weeds.
    I also add rattles in specific locations to add sound. I have tried the bell type bodies to add sound as well. Maybe it makes a difference and maybe not? I like all magnum flashabou for the tails as it doesn’t hold water. I have every color known, but mostly end up throwing some combination of black with another dark or bright color. I have mostly 2 tail sections but I have a few with 3 tail sections and they seem to get bigger fish. My theory is to not go up on the size 10 blades, but have a longer tail to create a larger silhouette. Less wear and tear on you that way when casting all day. Make sure the last hook extends past the end of the tail for nippers. Going above a 7/0 may make a difference, too. It is a cool feeling when you or a friend catches a nice fish on a lure you made. My first year making them, we got 25 muskies in a week on them. We notice a lot more follows these days. I’m trying to think of a way to entice followers into eaters. Maybe a chunk of Johnsonville brat? 

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Oct 2003
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    Athens, Ohio, US.
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    Ever try Uncle Josh pork rind? m

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    625
    My musky fishing started with a Mepps #3 and pork rind about 40 years ago. Mostly white in color, but I tried frog once in a while. Might have to go back to it as a trailer.
    Last edited by 1morecast; 01-11-2017 at 02:45 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Athens, Ohio, US.
    Posts
    385
    That there was my daddy's favorite combination for smallmouth; he'd put some pork on a daredevil for pikes. m

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