Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Trophy Pike in Canada Information

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Grafton, WI.
    Posts
    61

    Trophy Pike in Canada Information

    Hi,

    I am interested in trophy northern pike fishing Canada. By trophy, I mean lakes that consistently produce fish that are in the 45 to 50 inch length range. I have spent a few years catching pike in the 36-42 inch range, but am ready for the ‘next step’.
    If anybody has been to Canada chasing trophy pike, please share recommendations/experiences as to where/when to chase trophy pike.

    Thanks much for any info!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    IL, US.
    Posts
    339
    I have not stayed here, but a friend told me about this place. It may be a place to consider.

    http://www.silsbylakelodge.com/

    Brian

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    .
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by lelekb View Post
    I have not stayed here, but a friend told me about this place. It may be a place to consider.

    http://www.silsbylakelodge.com/

    Brian
    Hello, the pike noted in the pictures at that lodges website are not that large.

    A good chance for a large pike would be Lake of the Woods or Georgian Bay

    Cordially,

    MK

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Il.
    Posts
    294
    Taltson Bay Big Pike Lodge is the only place that anyone looking for trophy pike, true trophy pike should be looking. This is Great Slave Lake Northwest Territories...I shouldn't have to say more. www.taltsonbaypike.com is all you need to access 1000's of photos, many videos, and countless trip reports.

    Move the curser over the photo's to access info.
    Last edited by J_Mich; 07-20-2016 at 05:13 PM.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    14
    The ONLY place is Taltson Bay Big Pike Lodge. Saw the pics, saw the videos, met some guys who have been there. That alone should be your "next step". Book it.
    Some day it will be my trip.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    1
    So i'm planning a pike fishing trip in manitoba coming up and need a good pike setup that i can eventually use for musky as well. i ordered a tackle industries MH 9 ft rod and paired it with a Shimano Tranx 300 baitcaster. will this be too long for fishing on an 18 ft boat? i've heard it will be hard to set a hook on a big pike from 40 yards out with a longer rod. any thoughts and insights would be greatly appreciated!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,944
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyjoma View Post
    So i'm planning a pike fishing trip in manitoba coming up and need a good pike setup that i can eventually use for musky as well. i ordered a tackle industries MH 9 ft rod and paired it with a Shimano Tranx 300 baitcaster. will this be too long for fishing on an 18 ft boat? i've heard it will be hard to set a hook on a big pike from 40 yards out with a longer rod. any thoughts and insights would be greatly appreciated!
    I can't speak specifically about the TI rod because I've never used one, but the trend in musky fishing is toward longer rods. Many of us use 9- and even 10-footers for muskies all the time with no issues in hook-setting.

    Rods act as levers, so typically the longer they are the farther they cast, the easier they manipulate lures, the stronger the hook-sets, and the better they keep the line tight when a fish thrashes boatside.

    I have no idea why you'd think rod length matters in an 18-foot boat. It can be an issue in a canoe or kayak, but not in a boat.

    My only concern for rod length is if you're flying in. Usually fly-in services get nervous with longer rods or cannot accommodate them at all.

    The Tranx 300 is a great reel. You will love it. Use braided line of 50- or 65-pound test (which has the diameter equivalent to 14- or 16-pound test mono), and tighten the drag enough so it doesn't slip when you set the hook. You can always back off the star drag a quarter turn or so to accommodate the runs of a larger fish, but getting the hook set is your first priority.

    When spooling line onto the Tranx, fill the spool about one-fourth to a third of the way with monofilament as backing, then tie the braid to the mono with a blood or surgeon's knot. There are two reasons for this: 1. Braid is expensive and line deep down is wasted; 2. If you tie the braid to the spool without backing, it will slip on the spool and pay out under slight pressure, even if your drag is tight. It will seem as if your drag is wrecked when in actuality the line is just spinning on the spool. If you don't want to use mono backing and simply tie the braid to the spool, place a small piece of tape (duct or black electrician's tape works fine) over the line on the spool, which will keep the braid from slipping.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyjoma View Post
    So i'm planning a pike fishing trip in manitoba coming up and need a good pike setup that i can eventually use for musky as well. i ordered a tackle industries MH 9 ft rod and paired it with a Shimano Tranx 300 baitcaster. will this be too long for fishing on an 18 ft boat? i've heard it will be hard to set a hook on a big pike from 40 yards out with a longer rod. any thoughts and insights would be greatly appreciated!
    I'm from Manitoba, and the really good Pike areas are all fly-ins. So, your best bet is a 2-piece rod that you can pack into a protective tube so it doesn't get destroyed by the freight handlers for the big airlines (if you're flying to Winnipeg first). The smaller planes that are flying in the north are more used to handling rods, but never trust them, and always protect your gear in proper containers.

    For northern Pike fishing, if using a bait caster, I take a 300 series reel and a 7' 2-piece musky rod. This is not my usual musky rod, which is a 9ft one piece, but that heavy rod is not necessary and is very much over-kill for even the biggest Northern Pike.

    As an aside, leave all your musky baits at home if going north for Pike. Generally you will catch even the largest Pike on a 3" spoon or spinner. I generally use a spinning reel with 40 lb braid, and cast those spoons as far as possible along weed lines. With braid you're going to send that spoon out really far. A 7ft medium heavy spinning rod will handle all the monster Pike you catch.

    Have fun!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    .
    Posts
    84
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Heiting View Post
    The Tranx 300 is a great reel. You will love it. Use braided line of 50- or 65-pound test
    Steve, you previously mentioned you use braided 100-pound test.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,944
    Quote Originally Posted by MuskyKiller View Post
    Steve, you previously mentioned you use braided 100-pound test.
    I still do. The question in this thread is about a pike rig, and for casting smaller baits a long ways, a lighter braid should suffice, so I recommended it.

    I use two different line weights for muskies -- 65-pound test for smaller bucktails from Rizzo Wizzes up to twin 8's, as well as for 6-7" twitchbaits, crankbaits, etc.; and 100-pound test when I'm casting anything bigger. Many anglers split the gap and go with 80-pound test on all their reels.

    The lightest braid I use is 30-pound test (equivalent diameter of 6-pound mono) when casting minnowbaits for walleyes.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •