Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Bucktails and swim bait setup.

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    9

    Bucktails and swim bait setup.

    Pretty new to Musky fishing but experienced fishermen. I bought a st croix musky rod and an Abu Garcia winch for my first setup with close to 200 bucks in lures. Plan on using 30 lb braid. My question to you guys is should I be fishing a leader with bucktails and swim baits. If so what size and type do you recommend. Also is this line heavy enough?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Wis
    Posts
    358
    I'm sure you will gets lots of good info here. My .02 short version:

    Yes upsize the line. 80 lb is a good place to start.

    Yes you will need to run a leader. I usually do 100 lb flouro for Bucktails.

    Some folks go heavier yet. Certain situations may call for variations.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Athens, Ohio, US.
    Posts
    393
    Ditto on the 80 pound braid. I use Stealth fluoro leaders for bucktails and crankbaits, and their wire leaders for jerks. m

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    9
    I bought some stealth leaders yesterday. So 30lb braid is too small? I'm worried my reel won't be able to hold that much 80 lb

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Athens, Ohio, US.
    Posts
    393
    I really don't think that will make a difference on your reel. For example, Spiderwire Invisibraid that I use: 30 lb test = .012" diameter; 80 lb test = .018" diameter. The stronger line is necessary, not only to counter the jarring strikes you'll get, but if the line comes near a sharp part of the fish (teeth, gill plate) you want the stronger line to better resist losing the fish and your lure. I've seen muskies do a gator roll, where they wrap themselves in the line.
    Also better at yanking the bait out of trees, stumps, rocks.... at least I've been told. m

  6. #6
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,957
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodbro84 View Post
    I bought some stealth leaders yesterday. So 30lb braid is too small? I'm worried my reel won't be able to hold that much 80 lb
    All you need is 80 yards or so of braid for musky fishing. As Mikie said, the diameter of 80-pound test braid isn't that thick -- it's roughly equivalent to the diameter of 18-pound test monofilament.

    With braid, you need to choose line based on its diameter rather than breaking strength. 30-pound test is too light for musky baits, and if you use it you will find out why in short order.

    The reason for going with heavier braid is because it's so thin for its rated strength. Thin line doesn't have much room for error around sharp objects, and won't absorb shock well when you get a backlash -- meaning that it will snap and send your bait sailing. It also does a pretty good job of cutting into the spool, thus creating backlashes that you may likely have to cut out.

    I recommend using at least 65-pound test braid (approximate diameter of 16-pound test mono), up to 100-pound test (20-pound test mono equivalent) if you fish around lots of structure/cover. 80-pound test is a good, all-around line weight choice.

    Glad you bought the Stealth leaders. They are outstanding.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    899
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodbro84 View Post
    Pretty new to Musky fishing but experienced fishermen. I bought a st croix musky rod and an Abu Garcia winch for my first setup with close to 200 bucks in lures. Plan on using 30 lb braid. My question to you guys is should I be fishing a leader with bucktails and swim baits. If so what size and type do you recommend. Also is this line heavy enough?
    Put a little masking tape or mono on the reel spool for backing, and use 65, 80 or 100 lb test braid, depending on the lure weights you'll be using. If smaller baits, 65 or 80 is fine. If heavy baits, such as Mag or Pounder Dawgs, you'll want 80 or better yet 100 lb test braid.

    You didn't mention whether the reel was the larger or smaller spool width, or the rod specifics, which should also influence your line selection. If the rod is for lures less than 3 ounces, then 65 or 80 lb test will suffice.

    Most guys use flouro leaders at least as heavy as the line weight... usually heavier.

    I've used 30 lb test superline on bass type combos for 1/2 or 3/4 oz jigs with 6 inch shad baits or similar, again with no problems, but now use 50 lb test Stealth for even those baits.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    9
    I'll be fishing bucktails and swimbaits. Heaviest one I have so far is my swimbaits are 4 oz. the bucktails 1 1/4 oz and 2 oz. I got the Abu Garcia revo toro low profile on a St croix 7' fast action medium heavy power rod. Everyone has told me 80 lb braid so I'll be buying some of that. Also got some fluorocarbon leaders from stealth tackle

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    899
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodbro84 View Post
    I'll be fishing bucktails and swimbaits. Heaviest one I have so far is my swimbaits are 4 oz. the bucktails 1 1/4 oz and 2 oz. I got the Abu Garcia revo toro low profile on a St croix 7' fast action medium heavy power rod. Everyone has told me 80 lb braid so I'll be buying some of that. Also got some fluorocarbon leaders from stealth tackle
    You should be OK for those types of lures, though you may find the 2 oz bucktail pulls pretty hard, depending on the blade style. The rod usually lists recommended lure weights above the upper grip. Rods vary so much... I've found some MH rods are much stiffer than others, especially in the tip, which is probably where you'll notice it most if you are maxing out the rod blank.

    You'll find MH rods are also effective for surface baits, such as creepers and Hawg Wobblers. They offer a nice opportunity to slow things down, especially at dusk.

    Next most important thing is to keep your hooks dangerously sharp!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •