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Thread: Crossing Into Canada DUI

  1. #1
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    Crossing Into Canada DUI

    A young member of our LOTW trip group made an unwise decision at college and ended up with a DUI. As I understand it, he is pretty much done going on our trip for at least 5 years if not 10? I have read about a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP), but going to Sandyís Resort with your dad doesnít seem like a valid reason to be awarded one? Does anyone have any information on this? I have been going up there for 15 years and Iím still not sure I understand the call in procedure let alone this mess.

  2. #2
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    There is a lot of myth and misinformation on the internet on the subject of crossing the border into Canada with a DUI/DWI. I believe the following information are the significant elements of the decision: what the offense(s) was, how many offense(s) and when they took place. That is, the decision to allow entry into Canada is based on the facts of the matter. After this, the decision to allow anyone to cross into the border rests with the officer in the booth when you are parked in front of him or her.

    The best advice I can offer is to call your border crossing and speak to an officer in Immigration. You can also call the Canada Consulate in Minneapolis, MN. Explain the situation to the officer, put all the facts on the table and carefully listen to his/her response. In any event, have a back-up plan in place in case the young man is turned away at the border and your group of guys finds itself parked along a highway in the US saying "now what the ...... do we do?".

    I suspect the young man will not be allowed into Canada if his DUI was in the last five years. Canada's process for establishing "rehabilitation" can be expensive, can take a relatively long time and is without certainty of a favorable outcome.

    You are fortunate as a group to find out this situation now rather than having an unpleasant surprise when you arrive at the border crossing.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Dave, I agree with BornToFish's response. Better to get the info directly from the border officers rather than the Internet.

    That said, a friend and his son went through this last year. Even though the court proceedings would not have been complete when they were scheduled to make their trip to Canada, they cancelled the trip. They were up front with the border services people from the start, but when I saw them this spring they still weren't certain how long the son would not be allowed into Canada.

    Good luck. This is one of MANY reasons why a person should not drive and drive!
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  4. #4
    I had to cross the border for work purposes and it was a huge mess. We called ahead to have the border tell us what to do, but kept getting similar but different answers from everyone we talked to. In the end it was decided I needed to have a letter from our lawyers stating exactly what I would be doing (apparently, they don't want US citizens working in Canada if there's a Canadian worker who could do the work, which I can appreciate). Anyway, once I got to the border, the guy in the booth didn't care one bit what we had been told over the phone, and who had told us. 2 hours or so later, I made it in.

    Long story short, BornToFish is exactly right, the guy in the booth can make for a bumpy day regardless of what anyone else has told you.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys. It sounds like no matter what you do as far as legal stuff, you have to be prepared that he will not be able to cross. So, in other words he stays home unless he would like to spend a week in Warroad. It’s a shame. It was fun teaching him how to fish LOTW and watching him grow into a true musky nut. I was with him when he hooked into a 48 incher and that changed everything for him. Now that he is really into it, this happens. Oh well, a life lesson I guess.

  6. #6
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    A life lesson indeed, and if not being able to fish LOTW for five years is the worst thing that comes of it he's pretty lucky.

  7. #7
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    Good point.

  8. #8
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    Here's what I came up with after reviewing the Canucks' website a year ago:

    You are applying to be rehabilitated.

    Here is the page you should be looking at first:

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/informa.../guides/5312ET...

    Here is the application you need to fill out:

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/kit...s/IMM1444E.pdf

    Here is the page that talks about the $200 fee you need to pay up front:

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/kit...s/IMM5310B.pdf

    You have to wait until 5 years after probation expires to apply for anything unless no conviction was entered.

    I'm not certain about the availability of the TPR or the one-time pass for tourism purposes that was talked about the last couple years on the web. Supposedly the Canucks are relaxing a bit...but it's all up to the border agent you run into and their mood that day.

  9. #9
    You CAN get into Canada with a DUI, you just have to apply way in advance for a TRP, temporary resident permit. I am not sure of the whole process involved but I think it takes months to get it if you do so I suggest applying a year in advance to plan your trip. This is how actors, sports athelets etc.. get into Canada with DUI so they can play games against opposing teams or shoot movies etc.. Obviously they have lawyers doing all the footwork but they aren't treated special and the laws still apply to them.

  10. #10
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    Yeah even one my cousin was facing similar issues and he applied for TRP which got rejected for first time. Then he hired a good DUI lawyer and not sure what he did but he could get his TRP application accepted and processed.

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