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Thread: Finding new water/hidden gems?

  1. #1
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    Finding new water/hidden gems?

    Fairly new to this addiction we call Muskie Fishing...and by new I mean...a good many years casting for the beast...very VERY few fish to show for the effort...still learning and loving it in the process.

    The question I have is...if a solid Muskie lake has a small river(s) or small creek(s), leading out to other lakes in the area...is it reasonable to think those other lakes also have Muskie? Even if the DNR doesn't report it as a possible fish in those other lake(s)?
    Last edited by FALKAN98; 07-10-2014 at 02:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    It is possbile but there would be no gaurantee... if you are looking to catch fish the incedental population of fish in those lakes is going to be a tough to target and for size and nubmers you would be beter served focusing on established lakes. (IMHO)

  3. #3
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    I know this doesn't directly answer your question, but if possible, fish those rivers and creeks, too.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Creeks and rivers are exactly how you find the "hidden gems." If muskies have always existed in the known water, if there isn't an impassable rapids or waterfall in between it's practically a guarantee there will be muskies in the attached waters, provided they're large enough to sustain a population of fish.

    In waters that have been stocked to establish a population, it takes a while for muskies to populate the other waters, but it will happen.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  5. #5
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    If you suspect that a connecting body of water may have muskies in it due to musky migration from a known musky population ,, talk to the local DNR "fish biologist" ,, not the local warden ,, the biologist will have more of a sense as to whats going on in the local fisheries --- good luck ---- jimjimjim

  6. #6
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Heiting View Post
    Creeks and rivers are exactly how you find the "hidden gems." If muskies have always existed in the known water, if there isn't an impassable rapids or waterfall in between it's practically a guarantee there will be muskies in the attached waters, provided they're large enough to sustain a population of fish.

    In waters that have been stocked to establish a population, it takes a while for muskies to populate the other waters, but it will happen.
    No doubt. One of my favorite spots is a river connecting two known musky spots. Almost everyone looks at us fishing like we are crazy cause we have a big net and long poles using big lures. We are always the only one fishing it especially for skis. Almost everyone asks us what we are fishing for......big bass haha

  7. #7
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    Perfect...as I had suspected.

    Thank you all for the feedback. I have a week off work to go explore soon...there is a hatchery right on the way, very near where I'm going...I'll stop in there and visit some on my way...see what info I can gather...at least find out who the biologist is for the area I'm exploring.

    This opens up a whole new world...excellent...can't wait!!!

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