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Thread: Feeding Window and Location Selection

  1. #1
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    Feeding Window and Location Selection

    I actually posted this somewhere else and recieved some good responces. I wanted to pose the same question here to hear what you guys thought.

    I hear a lot about "feeding windows" and have experieced flurries of fish in a short period of time, then nothing for a long while to then experience another flurry. Here is my question. Would it be better to fish a location all day that you know has fish and wait for this feeding window or is it better to just search various hot spots looking for an active fish that may not suscribe to the feeding window theory? I ask this because there are a few lakes I know rather well and I feel like by moving too much I could be missing these feeding windows, but sitting in one area all day is rather boring for me. I was just wondering how you guys approach and view this question. Thanks.

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    that very question poses alot of problems with my view and fishing style
    i see it as a he said she said type thing.
    i read alot in magazines and books that claim to move alot and fish an area 20 min top and move on targeting active fish
    i also fish with friends who follow that rule to the T and usually do well and place in the top of tournys.
    i on the other hand have had good luck trying diff lures in an area i know holds fish and maybe thats my problem and why i cannot convince myself to keep moving from spot to spot
    i know if fish are there and i make 200 casts over 2 hrs time i eventually will pull something up even if its a dumb one or it just got tired of seeing things dart past its resting spot.
    i keep telling myself the next time im not staying in one spot for an hr without a bite but it just never happens

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    Anticipating feeding windows is one answer. Better to forcast periods of activity for differing locations and be there when the fish are active. Moon, sun, fronts etc all play into it,

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    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    I would rather fish multiple spots trying to locate a big fish and then return to it during an anticipated feeding window (which Bob mentioned). These could be fronts; moon rise, set, overhead and underfoot; or sun rise and set.

    Other things that may trigger a feeding window that cannot be anticipated is sudden change in barometric pressure or a wind shift. If either happen, go back to where you saw a fish you would like to catch. Also, if you are searching and catch a musky, go back to any that you've previously seen because there may be something else going on in the fishes' world that we do not recognize. If you don't have another/other fish spotted, go immediately to another spot that is relatively similar to the one where you just caught the fish.

    The sit-on-a-spot-all-day plan can be effective in tournament or other high fishing pressure situations. You're guarding the spot from other anglers while waiting for the fish to decide to eat. I would prefer not to look at the same spot all day.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

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    Blaster from the pasterses Big Guyses.

    "Musky Hunter Magazine: November 1996

    Jim Saric’s – “Dissecting Trophy Hotspots”

    “… My friend Joe Bucher always says, “you’ve got to give a trophy spot a chance to produce.” Sounds cliché, but there is a lot in that statement. Giving a trophy spot a chance to produce not only requires the ability to determine what makes an area a trophy spot, but it includes logging some time on the spot during prime conditions with a high percentage presentation.”

    Doeseeses the whitetailer element, turkey element, hellerbeller, "I'm going into the woods to kill something" element dooseeses finding a primer timer tree stander and waiter for the trophy, or dooseeses youses like to salt tail?

    Smile, You're On Musky Hunter T.V...

    http://66.133.129.5/~ddfenner/

  6. #6
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ddfenner View Post
    Blaster from the pasterses Big Guyses.

    "Musky Hunter Magazine: November 1996

    Jim Saric’s – “Dissecting Trophy Hotspots”

    “… My friend Joe Bucher always says, “you’ve got to give a trophy spot a chance to produce.” Sounds cliché, but there is a lot in that statement. Giving a trophy spot a chance to produce not only requires the ability to determine what makes an area a trophy spot, but it includes logging some time on the spot during prime conditions with a high percentage presentation.”

    Doeseeses the whitetailer element, turkey element, hellerbeller, "I'm going into the woods to kill something" element dooseeses finding a primer timer tree stander and waiter for the trophy, or dooseeses youses like to salt tail?


    I'm pretty sure Jim -- and Joe -- are suggesting that a person visit a good-looking spot time and again in prime conditions rather than camping on the spot until it produces. If doing the latter you risk overpressuring a big fish that may be there but inactive, or wasting time if nobody's home.

    A big fish spot almost always has complexity (ambush spots) with deep water and baitfish (currently) nearby. Spots that have produced as many as 12 fish for me in a week are useless when there are no baitfish around. Another spot that comes to mind was one I fished on and off for about 10 years without it producing more than the odd 40-incher, and then for a couple years straight it was productive with numerous big fish up to 53 inches ... and last year, nothing. The difference was baitfish on the graph when approaching the spot.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

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    when you spell it out like that i can understand exactly what your saying !
    when i read it coming from someone else it all makes more sense

  8. #8
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    “… My friend Joe Bucher always says, “you’ve got to give a trophy spot a chance to produce.” Sounds cliché, but there is a lot in that statement. Giving a trophy spot a chance to produce not only requires the ability to determine what makes an area a trophy spot, but it includes logging some time on the spot during prime conditions with a high percentage presentation.”

    Ummmmses, if you readypooh Franks articleses, theses ... reads "You might ask why not keep moving to find other active fish, which is a fair question, but sometimes it pays to wait it out and thoroughly work a big fish spot."

    Nowses, youses may sayses Frank's article is for the cold water seasonalismses, where fish inactivitieses have slowed and any feeding windowses could beses a few minuteses over several dayses.

    Andses, meses could sayses youses posty here is perhaps more bathy water inclined, yet there is some deviationalisms from even this. Escpecially, when meses thinky back to St. Paul when Hamernick and Hulbert talked about summertime night fishing.

    Meses remember the beader boyses saying about location and how fast to fishy: "Is that the same dock light we pulled up too two hours back?"

    Youses mentionalisms "ambush spots" or feeding stations as meses experienceses themers.

    Placeys the actives show up to eat... Baitfish may already beses thereses or soon to arrivals.

    Have youses not caught a musky when baitfish is present? We both knowses, it can work both wayses.

    Smile, You're On Musky Hunter T.V...

    http://66.133.129.5/~ddfenner/

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    I’m going to throw my two sense into this one. Your question is, I hear a lot about "feeding windows" and have experienced flurries of fish in a short period of time, then nothing for a long while to then experience another flurry. Here is my question. Would it be better to fish a location all day that you know has fish and wait for this feeding window or is it better to just search various hot spots looking for an active fish that may not subscribe to the feeding window theory?

    I think in part you have answered your own question. If you are experiencing these feeding windows, what are you doing at the time that have put fish in the net. What is going on around you, such as what any of the above have mentioned with regards to Mother Nature, etc.

    Are you keeping notes and recording the data to compare and dissect.

    Now look at those “long lull’s” what are you doing, etc., or not doing.

    The only way to figure out the puzzle, in part is time on the water, and putting all of the above advise together.

    As for camping on a spot, been there done that but also moving around from those spots on a spot milk run; fishing specific spots on the spot.

    Camping on a spot is a little more complex, you better know what’s going on beneath the boat in the water and know why or why not those fish would stay in a given spot / area all day. Because you can bet in today’s era of Musky fishing, you will not be the only boat fishing a give area in a day.

    Those Muskie’s will move and you better now why they are moving and move with them, as they may slip in and or out, etc. Especially in high pressure lakes and or changes produced by Mother Nature.

    I hope this helps and didn’t make matters more complex. The advise from the previous posts are all right on.
    Last edited by Esoxfable70; 07-10-2013 at 07:28 AM.

  10. #10
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    Camping vs. Run&Gun. This has been an age old debate and one that will probably never end. Both have value, no doubt. My preference is to camp on "revolving door" type spots. Structures where fish will move in an out frequently. This ensures you will be there when a "new" fish arrives. Still doesn't guarantee you will be there while the fish is there AND a window opens. But, the benefit of this is that you do not over-pressure a fish as previously stated. Also, camping is more beneficial when the revolving door type structure provides a feeding opportunity (baitfish present) rather than just a comfort spot. Feeding strikes are always better than excitement bites. And... it seems that there are more fish using a spot when there is food present rather than a comfort spot. This ups you chances of getting bit as well.

    I really like to run&gun comfort spots and hope to find a fish that is willing to play right now. Its got more fun factor in it for me. And, covering more water helps you identify locations that may be optimum for camping on when the time is right (locate baitfish).

    Lastly, recognizing when a window may be opening is also important. When you realize it... its time to double back on your milkrun and hit fish you've previously contacted or camp on the spots most likely to be holding multiple fish.

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