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Thread: best way to spool braided line

  1. #1

    best way to spool braided line

    i know theres a couple ways to spool braided line using mono for a backing or using tape and tie derect to to the spool which is better and do you put and drag on the reel while spooling i know the line has to be very tight so it wont slip and bury itself on to itself im confused about which is the best way thank you

  2. #2
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    I use mono equal in size to the braid I'm using. I put enough mono on so that I only have to put 90 yards of braid on. I used my range finder to cheat and it works awesome.

  3. #3
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    When I first started using braided line, I used a mono backer and tied it to my braid. (PIB)

    This is what I do now:
    I buy a roll of Scotch brand Self-fusing, Silicone Electrical tape. It comes in 1" x 30 ft. rolls. (One roll will do many reels) It is stretchy and self-fusing. That means when you begin wrapping/stretching it around your spool it actually fuses with the lower layer and becomes one with it. The key is to stretch it firmly to get a TIGHT wrap and good grip on the spool. (I remove the spool from the reel to do this) I wrap back and forth until I get the amount I want on the spool. Then, even though I try to keep it even across the spool, I always end up with the tape being thicker towards the sides of the spool where it slopes up. The nice thing about this tape is that you can trim this off with a sharp knife so that you end up with a nice even wrap. If you make a mistake or decide you don't want the tape on your spool later, you just make an incision with a blade the length of the wrap down to the spool, being careful not scratch it. The tape then easily peels of with NO residue at all.

    I tie my line to the spool which is now back in the reel and wind it up to full. Then before I do ANYTHING with that reel, I take it out in my boat and put on a hard-pulling crankbait and put the boat in gear and let all but the first wrap of line out as I move ahead. If I am alone I put the boat in neutral. (Going with the wind helps a lot) If someone is along I keep the boat in gear.
    I then reel in keeping the rod pointed straight back at the lure and maintain a good pull on the lure until it's all the way back. Now I can use this reel to catch Muskies.
    I have never had line dig or slip using this method.
    An idea for you to consider.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Dave View Post
    When I first started using braided line, I used a mono backer and tied it to my braid. (PIB)

    This is what I do now:
    I buy a roll of Scotch brand Self-fusing, Silicone Electrical tape. It comes in 1" x 30 ft. rolls. (One roll will do many reels) It is stretchy and self-fusing. That means when you begin wrapping/stretching it around your spool it actually fuses with the lower layer and becomes one with it. The key is to stretch it firmly to get a TIGHT wrap and good grip on the spool. (I remove the spool from the reel to do this) I wrap back and forth until I get the amount I want on the spool. Then, even though I try to keep it even across the spool, I always end up with the tape being thicker towards the sides of the spool where it slopes up. The nice thing about this tape is that you can trim this off with a sharp knife so that you end up with a nice even wrap. If you make a mistake or decide you don't want the tape on your spool later, you just make an incision with a blade the length of the wrap down to the spool, being careful not scratch it. The tape then easily peels of with NO residue at all.

    I tie my line to the spool which is now back in the reel and wind it up to full. Then before I do ANYTHING with that reel, I take it out in my boat and put on a hard-pulling crankbait and put the boat in gear and let all but the first wrap of line out as I move ahead. If I am alone I put the boat in neutral. (Going with the wind helps a lot) If someone is along I keep the boat in gear.
    I then reel in keeping the rod pointed straight back at the lure and maintain a good pull on the lure until it's all the way back. Now I can use this reel to catch Muskies.
    I have never had line dig or slip using this method.
    An idea for you to consider.
    Sounds like a lot more work than necessary. I always use mono as a backer because unless I am using a very small reel that doesn't hold much line. I don't want or need the entire spool to be braid. Like a previous poster mentioned, you only need around 90 yards of braid.

  5. #5
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    Not work at all. Takes about five minutes to do a spool. The reason I use the tape IS to build-up the spool so I can use 90 - 100 yards of braid. It replaces the mono for that purpose.

  6. #6
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    My method is kind of a pain, but doesn't waist braided line. Works best with two people. I measure out 75yds of braid with a lazer rangefinder. I reel that onto my reel. Then I tie my mono backing line to that. Next I reel on the mono till the spool is full, even a little over filled. Then, this is were a second person comes in handy, walk off all the line. Tie the mono onto the spool and reel it all in under pressure. I'm guessing most people buy braid in spools of 150 or 300yds. Now when I re-spool, I know I'm using 75yds of braid each time. Tom

  7. #7
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    Go to Thorne Bros. during their line winding sale... Drop your reels off with instructions as to what line you prefer on each, go shop, chit chat, what have you for a bit, pick them up 20 minutes later, bring your entire haul to the counter, pay, stop and pick up flowers for the wife at the little flower shop 2 miles south of TB, and go home. Thats my routine for braids. Works for this guy
    "I think animal testing is a terrible idea; they get all nervous and give the wrong answers"

    Geno

  8. #8
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    For what it's worth, I use mono backing too, using a knot to connect it to the superline. I always overfill, as I've found that after a few hours of use* it seems the superline compacts substantially. (maybe 10-20%) I'd rather cut a few feet off after a day or two than have a freshly under-spooled reel. I try to have at least 80-90 yards of superline, as I can cast many heavy lures about 60-70 yards, and I don't typically need to refill more than once every 2-3 seasons, noting I fish daily, but use 3-4 rod/reel combo's most days.

    If I was using a smaller capacity spool, I'd consider using tape and filling the reel with superline, noting a Revo Toro 50 will probably hold about 100 yards of 80 lb test superline over a small amount of tape or mono backing. (I know ABU says 200 yards of 14 lb mono, but I've never had a reel come close to the advertised capacity on any reel I've spooled)

    *I frequently let out a big lipped crankbait to the end of the superline, then retrieve it, noting that will compact it, but it will still compact more after additional fishing.
    Last edited by BLL_BIGFISH; 03-17-2013 at 09:01 PM.

  9. #9
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    Never cared much about how line goes on, because I put it on any which way, but then let it all out behind the boat at about 5MPH and reel it back steady against what is usually just the right pressure. Obviously, it's a bit different with musky braid cuz they are not all the same and most use mono-backing to save money even though a bit of friction tape is good enough to avoid the slippage. The key for me is: You cast out 40 yards, get on a submerged branch that could be a fish causing a monumental hook-set. If the braid is loosely spooled, you will dig and bury that line right before you reel the bait back to the boat. If you then cast 50 yards, you will go 10 yards past where your line is pinched in the spool and...well you know what happens next. So, clearly there is price to pay from having the line on too loose, just as there is having it on too tight. That (and the wind) is why we all still have to pick it out at least once or twice a day!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by short strike View Post
    Go to Thorne Bros. during their line winding sale... Drop your reels off with instructions as to what line you prefer on each, go shop, chit chat, what have you for a bit, pick them up 20 minutes later, bring your entire haul to the counter, pay, stop and pick up flowers for the wife at the little flower shop 2 miles south of TB, and go home. Thats my routine for braids. Works for this guy
    You sir, have undoubtedly, the best method discussed in this thread. Do the flowers help mitigate buyer's remorse?

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