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Thread: Abu garcia ambassadeur 5000

  1. #1
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    Abu garcia ambassadeur 5000

    I am considering giving musky fishing a try. I have caught musky by accident but never actually targeted them.
    Currently my heaviest gear is medium action walleye gear.
    I have an old Abu Garcia Ambassadeur 5000 real that was given to me.
    Would this be a good reel to put on a MH musky rod?
    What type/weight line is needed for musky fishing?

    Thanks in advance,
    Brian

  2. #2
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Hi Brian:

    Welcome to the sport. The Abu you described will work and be extremely durable, but you'll find, with time, it has its limitations. 20-25 years ago it was state of the art, now not so much. Use it, get your start with it, and if you find yourself wanting more there are smoother options with infinite anti-reverse and a wide selection of handles, from comfortable paddles to power handles.

    Spool up with a braided, Spectra-fiber line. It won't stretch, so you'll be able to maneuver your baits more easily and get better hooksets, and it won't rot or deteriorate so you can use it from year to year. Grand Slam Braid, PowerPro, Tuf Line, Cortland, Vicious and Suffix, among others, are all pretty good. I'm currently using Grand Slam Braid and really like it.

    The one caveat to braided line is you need to choose it according to its diameter, rather than breaking strength. While 30- or 40-pound test would seem to be sufficient for muskies, its diameter is only the equivalence of 8- or 10-pound test monofilament and lots can go wrong with line that thin. Most musky fishermen use 80- or 100-pound test braid, which has a manageable diameter equivalent to 18- or 20-pound test mono.

    When you spool up, fill the spool about 1/4 of the way with 12- or 15-pound test monofilament, then use a blood knot to tie the braid to the mono, and fill the spool up. The mono backing packs tight to the spool and won't slip, whereas braid will. The mono also helps fill the spool up somewhat since braid can be expensive. If you would rather just tie the braid to the spool, place a small piece of tape (duct, black, whatever) over the knot and this will keep it from slipping. If you use mono backing you'll probably get 80 yards or so of braid on the spool and that's all you need. If you skip the backing the reel may take 125 yards or more of braid to fill up.

    One final thought — baitcasters are extremely prone to backlashes IF they haven't been oiled recently, especially those older Abus. Before you even use it, take the reel apart and put a drop of reel or machine oil on all the friction points, as well as the worm gear in the levelwind. Your reel will function much more smoothly and be almost backlash-free.

    Good luck!
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  3. #3
    Those Abu reels are easy to work on. I had one that fell to the bottom of a lake, and took me an hour to snag it and bring it up. It was filled with mud and sediment. I cleaned the insides really good, put a few drops of hot sauce oil in it and it was good as new. Plus the parts for it are easy to get and replace. I still use some abu reels and for most of what I do they work great. If you are throwing mepps, or crankbaits, and gliders you will be fine.


    Mike

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by magoo View Post
    Those Abu reels are easy to work on. I had one that fell to the bottom of a lake, and took me an hour to snag it and bring it up. It was filled with mud and sediment. I cleaned the insides really good, put a few drops of hot sauce oil in it and it was good as new. Plus the parts for it are easy to get and replace. I still use some abu reels and for most of what I do they work great. If you are throwing mepps, or crankbaits, and gliders you will be fine.


    Mike
    I started with a 5000 years ago and have caught many muskies on it; as steve said it was the best reel out there by far. I would recommend the bigger handles that most sporting stores sell and are not that expensive. Much easier to reel and handle a fish. Started with the cisco kid topper but many baits are better made today like the stillwater from ty sennett. A bucktail will also work and you don't need more than that starting out to see if you like the sport. Beware once you are hooked you will soon be wanting more stuff and stuff and stuff.
    I agree with all Steve has said about line, oil etc; be sure you sharpen your hooks. This is a great sport and wish you well with you endeavors and welcome to muskie fishing.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by COPPERDOG View Post
    I am considering giving musky fishing a try. I have caught musky by accident but never actually targeted them.
    Currently my heaviest gear is medium action walleye gear.
    I have an old Abu Garcia Ambassadeur 5000 real that was given to me.
    Would this be a good reel to put on a MH musky rod?
    What type/weight line is needed for musky fishing?

    Thanks in advance,
    Brian
    Brian, Understanding you are planning on putting the ABU 5000 on a medium-heavy rod, first of all, I'd say that's a good fit. Next, as Steve said, then you want to put some mono backing on, and I'd recommend 65 or 80 lb test superline of your choice.
    (I like Spiderwire Stealth and FireLine, but have used many of the most popular lines... they are all great compared to the dacron we used to use)

    For lures, you can use larger bass lures, noting the MH rod will limit you to lures weighing about 2 oz maximum, and then not lures with large lips or blades, which are difficult to retrieve with a lighter rod.

    For lures, I recommend Rizzo Whiz spinners (I make my own) for early season fishing, and agree that smaller surface baits are also effective and easy to use with a MH rod. I think small-medium crankbaits are another good choice, such as Baby Shallow and/or Depth Raiders.

    Personally, I've found that heavier rods seem to hook a higher percentage of fish for me, but as long as stick with smaller lures with sharp hooks you should do fine.

  6. #6
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    Started with the cisco kid topper but many baits are better made today like the stillwater from ty sennett. A bucktail will also work and you don't need more than that starting out to see if you like the sport.
    === crosswords ===

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