Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Smaller Vilas County Lake Lure Advice

  1. #1

    Smaller Vilas County Lake Lure Advice

    Ok guys a little advice please:
    Since this is my first time targetting musky and I am going solo I am sure I am over thinking this but here is what I have tied on:
    Bluegill colored spring dawg
    Black River Bait Musky Freak
    #6 Blue Fox Buck tail

    With the cold front looking like it's going to hit on Saturday are these decent choices for the lake I am thinking of hitting (less than 500 acres)? Water temp will provbably be in the low 60's I am guessing? Like I said I am probably overthinking it but had to ask.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Elk Grove Village, Illinois.
    Posts
    547
    You're the guy going to Wildcat right?

    Used to fish there...They really like twitched minnow baits there, like a 6' grandma or a 7" shallow raider. perch or Walleye pattern both work well. Also the soft tail phantom is pretty much a killer on most WI lakes including that one, orange or firetiger pattern always get it done for me. There's a couple spots with sloppy weeds, you can use your top water there.

    Bucktails can always work of course, but with the chillier weather I would bet the twitched minnow bait gets bit more there like it used to for us.

    I would keep the spring dog in the tackle box if I were you

  3. #3
    I have a few grandmas and some super shad raps and baby jerko's, and x rap sub walks. Guess I will try one of those.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,956
    When fishing Wisconsin, regardless of lake size, you can never go wrong with something that looks like a perch, sucker, crappie, cisco or bluegill. (You can follow my preferences in the order I listed them.) You don't need to have ciscoes in the lake to use a cisco-colored bait because lots of lakes have shiners in them and there isn't much difference in color.

    I like orange-bellied perch on darker water lakes and white-bellied perch on clear water lakes. Firetiger is another perch variation and tends to be best in darker water or low light conditions.

    Even bucktails can look like a perch with brass or copper blades and a tail with shades of brown, gold, green and orange.

    With time you'll find each lake has color idiosyncrasies. On some, where I fish around cisco schools, I find that baits that look like rainbow trout can be very effective.

    Good luck!
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,956
    Quote Originally Posted by smbrickner View Post
    I have a few grandmas and some super shad raps and baby jerko's, and x rap sub walks. Guess I will try one of those.
    Here's the weather forecast for the St. Germain area for the next three days:

    Friday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 71. West wind between 10 and 15 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph.

    Friday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 48. West wind between 6 and 9 mph becoming calm.

    Saturday: A 50 percent chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 65. East wind between 5 and 9 mph.

    Saturday Night: Showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 51. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

    Sunday: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 78.

    Sunday Night: A chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 61.

    Saturday will be the second day after the front that's passing this afternoon/evening. I'd lean heavily on the twitchbaits early, and with Sunday's warmth and chance for T-storms the muskies may get ramped up enough for bucktails. (These are just guesses ... these are muskies, and anything can happen. One of my best bucktail days ever in Vilas County occurred in early June with 56-degree water temps and 46-degree air temps!)
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Madison, WI, U.S.A.
    Posts
    240
    I would recomend a baby Squirko or a MF Shad from MuskieTrain
    they have been my best 2 baits sofar this early season.
    The Baby Squirkos really shine under cold front conditions.
    Don't be afraid to try smaller walk the dog surface baits under low light conditions. The One eyed Willy JR. has been good this year also with lots of fish up to 46" Key is to work them Slow
    Good Luck,
    Jeff Hanson

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    .
    Posts
    274
    Can't go wrong with little twitch baits like grandmas, cranes or jakes. Twitch with nice, long pauses!

  8. #8
    Do you crank them down and then start twitching? or use long pulls to get them down? Or both?
    Thanks for the tips guys, if you see a 6'7 guy in a black Lund Predator on Saturday say hi. If you see me fighting a fish come over and take my pictures since I will most likely be solo.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 1994
    Location
    Minocqua, WI, United States.
    Posts
    2,956
    Quote Originally Posted by smbrickner View Post
    Do you crank them down and then start twitching? or use long pulls to get them down? Or both?
    Thanks for the tips guys, if you see a 6'7 guy in a black Lund Predator on Saturday say hi. If you see me fighting a fish come over and take my pictures since I will most likely be solo.
    Twitching minnowbaits at this time of year is typically a shallow-water presentation, so no real need to crank the bait down. You're trying to imitate a dying baitfish and floating toward the surface in between struggles to stay upright is what they do.

    I start twitching right away after the bait hits the water. Whether I initially twitch the rod tip downward or upward at the start of the retrieve depends on the cover. If there is no wood and the weeds are low, I'll twitch downward to get a little depth. If there's wood or the weeds are high, I'll twitch upward to keep the bait just under the surface. Three-four twitches, pause, and let the lure almost rise to the surface, two-three more twitches, pause, two-three twitches, pause ... that's the cadence.

    A couple more considerations:

    1. If you're twitching upward because of cover, about halfway back to the boat you'll reach a point where further upward twitching will pull the minnowbait from the water. At this point switch to a downward twitch.
    2. About 20 feet from the boat I let the minnowbait rise to the surface and let it lay there for a moment. (This is called the boatside rise.) This will often trigger a following musky, and if one rises but doesn't eat it's prime for deadsticking. If there's nothing there, I reel the bait in, do a fig-8, and cast again.

    Good luck.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •