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Thread: Top Fishing Tackle Brands

  1. #1
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    Top Fishing Tackle Brands

    Interesting stuff just released:

    Top Fishing Equipment Brands for 2011

    FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. - Southwick Associates’ AnglerSurvey.com announced the brands and products anglers purchased most frequently in 2011. This list has been compiled from the 29,495 internet-based surveys completed by anglers who volunteered to participate last year in AnglerSurvey.com polls.

    In 2011, the top brands include:

    • Top rod brand: Shakespeare (9.6% of all purchases)
    • Top reel brand: Shimano (21.4% of all purchases)
    • Top fishing line producer: Berkley Trilene (13.1% of all purchases)
    • Top hard bait brand: Rapala (21.8% of all purchases)
    • Top soft bait brand: Zoom (15.2% of all purchases)
    • Top spinner bait brand: Strike King (16.4% of all purchases)
    • Top sinker brand: generic (28.8%), Bullet Weights (12.1% of all purchases)
    • Top fly rod brand: Orvis (10.4% of all purchases)
    • Top fly reels brand: Orvis (16.5% of all purchases)
    • Top fly combo brand: Cabela’s (31.5% of all purchases)
    • Top fly line brand: Scientific Angler (3M) (23.8% of all purchases)
    • Top fly leader brand: Rio (28.9% of all purchases)
    • Top tackle box brand: Plano (45.8% of all purchases)
    • Top landing net brand: Frabill (24.5% of all purchases)
    • Top fishing knife brand: Rapala (25.2% of all purchases)

    • Largemouth bass remain the number one targeted species of freshwater fish, with 52% of fishing activity targeting largemouth bass.
    • Saltwater anglers were more varied, with 31% of trips targeting redfish/red drum, followed by any saltwater fish that bites (25%), flounder (24%), spotted seatrout or weakfish (23%) and striped bass (20%). Please note these refer to species targeted on trips and not the number of fish actually caught.
    • A comprehensive 2011 fishing tackle market review will be presented in the April issue of the Fishing Tackle Retailer.

    And, for those of you who hunt, you may wish to continue reading:

    Top Hunting and Shooting Equipment Brands for 2011

    FERNANDINA BEACH, Fla. — Southwick Associates has announced the brands hunters and shooters purchased most frequently in 2011. This list has been compiled from the 41,923 internet-based surveys completed by hunters and target shooters who volunteered to participate last year in HunterSurvey.com and ShooterSurvey.com polls. In 2011, top brands included:

    • Top rifle brand: Remington (16% of all purchases)
    • Top shotgun brand: Remington
    • Top muzzleloader brand: CVA (37.2% of all purchases)
    • Top handgun brand: Sturm, Ruger (17.1% of all purchases)
    • Top scope for firearms: Bushnell (16.7% of all purchases)
    • Top rifle ammunition brand: Remington (25.5% of all purchases)
    • Top shotgun ammunition brand: Winchester (32.1% of all purchases)
    • Top handgun ammunition brand: Winchester (20.7% of all purchases)
    • Top blackpowder brand: Pyrodex (47.9% of all purchases)
    • Top balls, bullets, or shot brand: Hornady (31% of all purchases)
    • Top arrow brand: Carbon Express (39.6% of all purchases)
    • Top fletching brand: Blazer (23.6% of all purchases)
    • Top broadhead brand: Rage (28.7% of all purchases)
    • Top archery target brand: The Block (14.1% of all purchases)
    • Top decoy brand: Mojo (16.5% of all purchases)
    • Top game call brand: Primos (28.7% of all purchases)
    • Top reloading bullet brand: Hornady (33% of all purchases)
    • Top reloading powder brand: Hodgdon (36.7% of all purchases)
    • Top binocular brand: Bushnell (31.3% of all purchases)
    • Top holster brand: Blackhawk (15.1% of all purchases)
    • Top knife brand: Buck (19.1% of all purchases)
    • Top cover scent brand: Wildlife Research Center (25.7% of all purchases)
    • Top shooting target brand: Shoot-N-C (29.5% of all purchases)
    • Top clay brand: White Flyer (42.4% of all purchases)

    The marketing data presented here is a summary of a 239-page report that details consumer behavior including what products and brands are purchased, where they are bought, how much customers spend, and demographics of hunters and shooters broken out by each product category. Current information about what gear and brands hunters and shooters prefer, how many days they spend afield and what type of hunting and shooting they enjoy most is vital to businesses trying to build their customer base.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the info Steve, this is very interesting and neat to see the percentages that certain companies cover in the industry.
    Roy Darnell

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    Any idea what percentage muskies would be?

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    I'm surprised....I thought you only had to buy one Ugly Stik...looks like they sell a lot of em !

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    The statistic for Rapala's share of the hard baits is really impressive. With all the manufacturers out there, to get over 20% of the market it quite an achievement. I have had good luck with their baits on everything but muskies so I do understand why people buy them.

  6. #6
    With all the fly rod companies out there that are really good, Orvis somehow took the spot. On a side note, I keep hearing a rumor that at one time Sage used to make musky rods. Has anyone ever seen or heard of these mysterious Sage musky rods? They now mostly make amazing fly rods, but I don't doubt they used to be more diverse.


    magoo

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    I used to have a bunch of Ugly Sticks. They were the best deal for downrigger fishing I could find. You could really "J" the rod a lot better than straight graphites or 100% glass rods. That doesn't suprise me at all they are that popular. And with the wooden handles, they were tough, never had a problem with them except for the occassional guide getting stepped on by some klutz (read me). Can't say I cared for them as regular casting or jigging rods, they were a little to whippy in the tip section for my tastes, but even they were brutes. Got a 5'5" heavy pistol grip one for my first baitcaster for bass. Had a hit on a plastic worm, locked my thumb down on the spool ala musky fishing and popped 10# on the hookset sounded, like a 22 shot.

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    Bushnell over Leupold? Maybe cheaper stuff sells more, but no way quality wise.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Steve Heiting's Avatar
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    A couple thoughts on this ...

    • If this doesn't illustrate that how the bass market goes, so goes the fishing tackle industry, I don't know what does.
    • I'm glad to see that four companies that make efforts in the musky fishing world (Frabill, Shimano, Plano and Rapala) are represented.
    • The same company that owns Rage broadheads also owns The Block targets ... I've always felt this explains why Rage includes a free practice head with a 3-pack of broadheads, when their broadheads are supposed to "fly like a field tip." Ever see what a Rage practice head does to a Block target? It doesn't do much on the way in, but SHREDS them on the way out.
    • All those Pyrodex users must like sooty rifles. Triple Seven shoots just as hard and ignites as well, but takes a fraction of the effort to clean.
    • I found it curious that Sturm, Ruger is the top handgun brand in this poll when I've heard that Glock sells about 60% of the handguns in the US.
    Steve Heiting

    www.steveheiting.com

  10. #10
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    I wasn't surprised by Sturm Ruger since their hanguns (p series) start around $3-350 vs. $500 for a Glock. A P89dc was my first handgun and it was built like a tank, unfortunatly it also felt like one in my hand.

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